Unlocking the secrets of weight loss

If you have read my blog will know I have struggled with weight loss over the years whether it’s a lack of motivation or simply not having the will power to succeed! It’s been a long  and painful journey!

As a child born in the 60s the food I ate at home and school was very different to what is available today, my Mum was a different generation and looking back there was not the nutritional awareness or variety that we have today of food types and diet.  Whilst the food was wholesome, I think back of the staple school dinners of pies, minced beef cobbler, vegetables and sponge puddings with custard I ask myself – was it really that healthy? My generation always ate school dinners and likely Mum cooked dinner in the evening when Dad came home from work. Perhaps by today’s standards of school dinners ours  were better but perhaps not as balanced. The food we had when I was a child was mainly cooked from scratch it wasn’t the over processed and fast food of recent years. Of course school dinners are a whole other issue #jamieoliver  #schooldinners and not a topic for today’s blog 

In my days of school, food and nutrition was not a subject that was widely available. PE or games was doing the activity not Learning about how the body works or responds to exercise and nutrition. Nowadays there is the option to learn more but should more time be spent in bringing these subjects into the general curriculum?

Of course Mum gave us a balanced diet at home but was it as healthy compared to today’s standards and have those bad eating habits developped through childhood lead the way to weight gain?

My Mum often says that she survived her pregnancy on chip butties as she could not tolerate other foods. I now know that did not help me in my body make up and the way I respond to food.

So how are the secrets to weight loss actually unlocked? Interestingly in his book The Obesity Code Jason Fung explores calorie deception, the new model of obesity what is wrong with our diet and the solution (amongst other aspects)

As a failed dieter and someone whose weight has gained after each relapse I can relate totally to his writings. My weight has steadily gained and in the last few years where my work has be come exceptionally stressful I can see the impact that has on my weight. I do now go  to the gym but only 2/3 times a week – This is not ideal but an improvement on not doing anything! No exceed isle is where I’d fallen to 6 months ago when my stress levels meant I could not be bothered to do anything. I don’t overreat, my diet is healthy but I can’t seem to kick start that weight loss. 

On Monday TOH and I decide to break the code with the suggested intermittent fasting. Monday was a total fast day and I have to say I was pleasantly surprised. I did it, it wasn’t as difficult as I thought it would be! Tuesday I ate simply and to suggestions in the book and today Wednesday is another fast day. Ideally Friday I should fast too but I have a work BBQ so maybe just an evening meal! My aim is to try to follow the plan for 4 weeks doing the 36 hour fast protocol, i.e. fasting on 3 days a week to reset my homeostasis, my insulin levels and my body! Watch this space, please send your positive energy to my for success and I will report back to you!

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Burn fat with fat

JsMe  

Love this article shared…..

” A recent article has a few take home points that I would contend. The article suggests that eating before a workout is critical so that the body stays away from cannibalizing its own muscle the moment you break a sweat. Additionally, it suggests that the body strictly burns sugar for energy. Finally, the article proposes that stocking up on sugars prior to exercise is the answer to avoid bonking. Sounds like the traditional line from the typical performance nutrition “expert” who has neglected to understand the real story behind pre-workout fueling. Lets review the facts about fueling the body as I explain my points of contention. 

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT HOW THE BODY IS FUELED

The body has an alternative, more efficient and effective fuel source other than sugars: fat! 

When you load up on carbs before activity, the body will choose the sugar every time.

This means that your body never has a chance to get into a state of fat burn. It’s amazing to me that everyone who breaks a sweat during a workout is in some way motivated by burning fat, but so many insist fueling with sugar. 

Burning primarily sugar for fuel is a devastating error in the quest to shed body fat. Not only does it mean that you limit your chances of torching body fat but the cost of running on sugar at the cellular level is much greater than the cost of burning fat. The article at the root of this discussion suggests that ATP is a naturally occurring energy source in the body. ATP is indeed the currency of energy in the body but saying it is “naturally occurring” is misleading. It is produced by converting either sugar or fat into a usable energy source.

ATP is indeed the currency of energy in the body but saying it is “naturally occurring” is misleading.

Dumping out your piggybank of carbs or fats at your body’s cash register and expecting your body to give you energy in return would be like dumping your piggybank of american coins and dollars on the counter of a store in Canada. They are going to ask you to convert your American dollars into Canadian currency before making the sale. The point is that the body requires you take your carbs (sugars) and fats to the bank for exchange into the proper currency. The bank is your cell (specifically the Proton Pump) and the proper currency for usable energy is ATP. 

TAKE NOTES – THIS IS BIG

You get taxed on converting sugars into ATP differently than you get taxed on converting fat. Within the cell, during the conversion of sugar into ATP there are three compounds of Carbon Dioxide that are produced as a byproduct of the conversion process. When you bring fat to the cell to be converted into ATP only two compounds of CO2 are produced as a byproduct of the conversion process.

In other words the tax on converting sugar to ATP is 30% greater than when you convert fat into ATP. CO2 makes the cellular environment more acidic. A more acidic cell sounds to me like something to avoid, but here’s exactly why it’s the opposite of good: the lower pH environment in the cell results in less ATP production by the Proton Pump. Less ATP equals less available fuel or energy. 
See the Proton Pump pumping out ATP (gold nuggets) in this cellular animation video from 1:10 – 1:30:

SOLUTION

Direct your body towards burning your own body fat for energy. Eating cereal and “energy bars” before exercise is not the way. Eating primarily healthy fats and proteins no sooner than 2-4 hours prior to exercise and pumping the brakes on the carbs until after the gym is one way. Taking in the healthy fats more regularly trains your cells how to use fat for fuel more efficiently. The post-training carbs will top-off any depleted glycogen stores just in case you ever need them. Only thing is you may not need them very often if you are regularly burning fat for fuel – converting fat into energy equals more gold nuggets of ATP available to do more work with! 

TAKE TO THE TRENCHES

Start slow and give this a try before your less intense, shorter workout days to get used to it. Keep in mind that unless you are hungry there is no law that says you must eat before you break a sweat. Assuming your goal is fat burn then exercising on an empty stomach is one way to become a fat burning machine!

IF YOU LIKED WHAT YOU READ HERE, BE SURE TO SHARE IT.  

@tdathletesedge #paleo #paleodiet #crossfit #TDAE

Tim DiFrancesco, PT, DPT, ATC, CSCS is the Head Strength & Conditioning Coach for the Los Angeles Lakers and President of TD Athletes Edge, where he provides fitness, recovery and nutrition guidance to aspiring and professional athletes. For training advice, visit http://www.tdathletesedge.com and follow him on Twitter/Instagram through @tdathletesedge. 

References:

Powering the Cell: Mitochondria [Motion picture]. (n.d.). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RrS2uROUjK4.
Special thanks to Dr. Cate Shanahan and Luke Shanahan for helping me to explore the goldmine that is the Proton Pump.”

Have I really found my mojo?

When you have a considerable amount of weight to lose its easy to give up, not stay focused and make up excuses. I think I have been doing that for the last 23 years! My eldest child is 23 and really since that pregnancy I have not worried about my weight. Maybe not worrying isn’t the right thing to say as I was lucky enough to play lots of sport which kept my weight down, I ate normally but not excessively I worked in London and I would have toast for breakfast and then a sandwich and snack for lunch and whatever evening meal I fancied. I didn’t really think about weight I wasn’t super slim just average (I would love to be there now) some things were tight on me but I never slimmed into clothes.

I did go on a diet after having my son and probably lost a stone That was with weight watchers. Thinking back that’s probably the only time I have ever been successful at a slimmimg. Club and got to target. The trouble is staying there!

Thinking about why this has been the case over the last few weeks has been a revelation to me. I think It’s so much to do with confidence. My first marriage broke down when my son was coming up to 8 years old but for 3-4 years before that I was not happy in myself and with the relationship. 

I didn’t feel valued or confident and that’s when I will have a few extra wines pick at food etc… 

After that breakdown I crashed with another unsuccessful relationship and breakdown and now bear the burden of feeling guilty from the effects of that breakdown! The blessing was a lovely child but sadly for her she didn’t have her parents together. Just feeling good about myself did not come naturally.

It’s easy to blame others for your problems and difficulties and not address the issue of your weight gain and I think that is something I have buried.  I haven’t wanted to face it, well the underlying unhappiness which I think is part or the cause. Well I have faced it and need to do something about it for me! I need to feel confident that I can be successful on this journey. 

Acknowledgingi that it will be a journey is important as I need to realise this won’t be a quick fix but may take a year or more.  God knows it took 23 years to get here!

So I have read a lot of books, diet plans and articles.

 What is key in so much of the celebrity articles is that X has lost so much weight in a certain time and they have lots of energy but what they fail to mention is they probably had a dietician, cook and personal trainer helping them.  Your average Jane doesn’t have that support or unlimted funds so I am going to do this but my way and with luck this time I will be successful.
The principles I will be taking with me on this journey and food plans to follow for the first months at least is trying to steer clear of traditional processed carbs, bread, cereals, pasta rice etc? I do cook from scratch but my aim is to to eat cleanly.
So to report on my initial days

Day one I haven’t been shopping in a while so had to make do. I had 2 hard boiled eggs for breakfast. Took an apple to work for a snack and homemade soup for lunch.

The soup was made in a new soup maker (fantastic buy) with 1 onion, 2 sweetpotatoes, a red pepper, a chilli and 2 slices of butternut squash cut into chunks. All veg peeled and chopped. I had a hearty bowl of soup! 

When I got home after the school run I went to my gym and did a short spin class for 30 minutes then came home (from small acorns!)

Diner was simple I chopped 2 onions, a pepper, courgette, half an aubergine and again a couple of slices of squash onto an oiled tray (olive oil) seasoned and put over herbs cooked for 30 minutes and had with a small seasoned Turkey breast.

Desert was some Greek yoghurt, not lo fat with defrosted cherries.

Oh and I did make another soup for today, curried squash with onion and a red pepper, I had a bowl of it too

!Feeling inspired!

#healthyeating #recipes

Why ketogenic?

The whole idea of a ketogenic diet sounds so appealing. To be in the state of ketosis when your bodily fat is being effectively consumed from within is something that I would imagine all of the overweight people would hope to achieve. It’s almost like creating your own science project and you are the project. The extremes of it is what worries me, the need to check urine samples and some even go so far as blood samples to see if their body is in the state of ketosis. It’s all going a bit far for my liking and maybe though it’s why I am a failed dieter as I will not go the extra step and have the single mindedness to pursue this dream.

The whole paleo, Banting NSNG is appealing as of course their diet, in my opinion (theirs may differ) is ketogenic.

You do need the right tools though to be successful. Obviously firstly is frame of mind and with that comes determination and self belief, we can all diet it’s not rocket science – just eat less! Also we need to have the right foods available to us and to plan our menus for tasty and satisfying food that once eaten will not cause us to waiver! Sometimes that is of course easier said than done.

I have found that I am most successful when dieting if I record what I eat and initially check quantities as guessing portion size can sometimes be haphazard. To this end the wonderful app My Fitness Pal (MFP) is very useful and once you have stored your favourites on it you will find you can add your daily foods simply and sometimes just by scanning the bar code. Recipe creation is easy too, though not so easy to amend a recipe once created!

My failure to date has been not correctly measuring my quantities and recording my foods – well and of course eating the wrong foods!

I have also discovered a great website that actually works out for you on a ketogenic basis what your protein carbohydrate fat intake should be! As the app MFP gives you a breakdown of these ratios in food they both work together really well. Here is the site:

http://keto-calculator.ankerl.com

Or you can try:

http://www.ruled.me/keto-calculator/

For the next week I am going to use the MFP to track my success and monitor how closely I am following the suggested ratios and what the results for me are.

I am also conscious that I don’t drink enough water. I probably have only 4 drinks a day, MFP enables you to record your drinks too so I need to make use of this and record!

Exercise is another issue, you can record what you do on MFP so it’s a really handy app to have!

What is your body fat percentage? These pictures help you to have a rough guess

Diets aka healthy eating (actually another word for a diet)

I really have a love hate relationship with dieting. Obviously I hate having to be on a diet or plan as restricting foodstuffs is so annoying but I acknowledge the fact that sadly my body lets me down by not converting all the glorious calories I have consumed over the decades into fat.

Life really isn’t fair! I have diligently followed my plan for a month and all I can show for it is a loss of about 8 pounds. I know that’s a good steady loss but I want dramatic!! I want about a stone. TOH is really not helping me as he is doing very well and has dedication going to the gym at least 5 times a week and endlessly standing in front on the mirror saying how reem he is looking. Whilst I congratulate him I am of course jealous of his progress as my own body has shamelessly not followed its part of the deal even though I am being angelic.

So 3 weeks until our holiday and ideally I want to lose 2 stone……… Short of cutting off my head or contracting sickness and diarrhoea my options are limited.

As it was the MD 21st last weekend I have to acknowledge that maybe the wine and champagne last Sunday and wine on Tuesday plus big BBQ and Indian meal maybe contributed to my undoing. Perhaps not quite so angelic!

So onwards and upwards in my quest for half a stone before the holiday I will be as perfect as TOH follow my plan and get to the gym a little more so I can be all inclusive on holiday and watch those pounds creep back on!

I will then have the joy of a Christmas countdown…………… My actual quest is to be fab and fifty not fat and fifty!

That picture is of course my aim! Am I deliberately setting myself up for a fall?……

Calcium – are you getting enough?

Been looking at my break downs of food on my app and horrified to see my calcium is so low!! I need to address it so had a quick bit of research and found this article which may be of interest.

18 Surprising Dairy-Free Sources of Calcium

ByLaura SchwecherlApril 7, 2014

Fun fact: Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body, and is found naturally in a wide variety of foods and beverages and added to many others! (Hellooo orange juice.) But whether lactose-intolerant or sick of wine and cheese parties, there’s no need to rely only on dairy products for that daily dose of calcium. Here’s why we should get enough calcium—and all the unexpected ways to get enough of it.

Beyond the Dairy Aisle—The Need-to-Know

It’s no secret that calcium is vital for strong bones and teeth, but it goes beyond that. This mineral also helps the body maintain healthy blood vessels, regulate blood pressure, and even prevent insulin resistance (which could lead to Type 2 diabetes) [1]. Adults should consume about 1,000 mg of calcium per day (which translates to about one glass of skim milk, one thick slice of cheddar cheese, and one cup of plain yogurt), yet most Americans still fail to meet the mark. According to one survey, only 16 percent of females ages 20 to 29 get enough calcium [2]. The main calcium contenders are milk, yogurt, and cheese, but dairy shouldn’t be the only dietary pit stop to fill up on this nutrient. Leafy greens, seafood, legumes, and fruit also contain calcium and many foods and drinks are fortified with the mineral. Just remember to try and pair non-dairy sources of calcium with vitamin D: The body needs vitamin D to help absorb calcium!

Craving Calcium?—Your Action Plan

Here’s a list of foods and beverages filled with calcium (no cows required), along with recipes to help make them an everyday occurrence in a variety of meals.

Natural Calcium
Since most Americans aren’t getting enough nutrients through natural foods alone, they often rely on enriched foods and supplements [3]. Sail down the grocery aisle and stock up on these items, au natural!

1. White Beans: 191 mg (19% DV) in 1 cup canned
Creamy and light, these legumes are a great source of calcium and iron [4]. Add them to a pasta dish with veggies, or skip the chickpeas and make your own hummus with white beans.

2. Canned Salmon: 232 mg (23% DV) in ½ can with bones (which provides the calcium!)
To avoid putting a dent in the wallet, canned salmon is a great way to go. Here’s the catch: It’s the bones in canned salmon that hold all the calcium, so they need to be mashed up right along with the salmon meat for all the benefits! But don’t get turned off just yet — the canning process softens the bones so they easily break apart and are unnoticeable when mixed in with the rest of the can’s contents. For a boost of calcium and omega 3’s, try these salmon cakes.

3. Sardines: 321 mg (32% DV) in about 7 sardines fillets
There’s nothing fishy about sardines—they are one of the healthiest fish to munch on! Along with calcium, they also provide a hefty dose of omega 3’s and vitamin D. Try adding them to a Greek salad or eat ’em straight out of the can.

4. Dried Figs: 107 mg (10% DV) in 8 whole dried figs
For a sweet treat, this dried fruit packs an antioxidant, fiber, and calcium punch [5]. Eat them as a mid-day snack, or turn these delicious dried fruits into a creamy jam.

5. Bok Choy: 74 mg (7% DV) in 1 cup
This versatile Chinese cabbage provides a hefty dose of vitamins A and C, along with calcium and fiber. Stir-fry bok choy with garlic and olive oil for a perfect side dish.

6. Blackstrap Molasses: 172 mg (17% DV) in 1 tablespoon
When the sweet tooth strikes, it’s best to go natural. Blackstrap molasses is darker in color and richer in flavor than regular molasses, and is filled with calcium, iron, and other vitamins. Plus, it’s a great sweet and flavorful addition to many dishes. Drizzle some on pancakes, or use it to make brown sugar.

7. Kale: 188 mg (19% DV) in 2 cups raw (chopped)
This superfood is filled with calcium and antioxidants, and is perfect to use as the base of any salad when shredded into thin strips. A kale salad with apricots and avocado is a perfect springtime dish.

8. Black-eyed Peas: 185 mg (18% DV) in 1/2 cup canned
I gotta feeling this is not just a band. These beans are filled with calcium, potassium, folate, and more! Skip the fat-filled mayo and whip up this black-eyed pea spread to pump up any sandwich or appetizer.

9. Almonds: 72 mg (7% DV) in ¼ cup dry roasted (about 20 nuts)
You’re “nuts” if you don’t grab a handful of almonds every now and then! They’re the most nutritionally dense nut, packing a crazy amounts of nutrients per calorie and ounce. Aside from calcium, they also contain potassium, vitamin E, and iron. Sprinkle on a salad or make your own almond butter. Just watch out for portion size!

10. Oranges: 65 mg (6% DV) in 1 medium fruit
Orange-you glad we included oranges?! Full of vitamin C and calcium, enjoy this fruit as a mid-morning snack, or use its citrus flavor to brighten up any dish, like these honey-orange carrots.

11. Turnip Greens: 197 mg (20% DV) in 1 cup cooked (chopped)
This leafy green comes from turnip bulbs, and is filled with calcium, antioxidants, and folate, which could help improve mood. Sautee them as a side dish, or spice things up and make a turnip tart.

12. Sesame Seeds: 88 mg (9% DV) in 1 tablespoon
These unassuming seeds are more than just a hamburger bun decoration. Sesame seeds can help lower blood pressure, reduce inflammation, and may even fight against certain cancers. Use their nutty crunch in a salad, or add to this sautéed spinach dish.

14. Seaweed: 126 mg (13% DV) in about 1 cup raw
Fish aren’t the only, well, fish in the sea. Seaweed is full of calcium, fiber, and iodine, which helps with proper thyroid function [6] [7]. Bring a bowl of risotto up a notch with this seaweed recipe. Feel like keeping it classic? Try your hand at a classic miso soup.

Fortified with Calcium
Fortifying foods with calcium has become a popular way to help people consume a balanced diet, but some studies do suggest eating foods with naturally occurring nutrients is the better route to take [8] [9] [10]. So just make sure you’re not only reaching for the fortified kinds!

14. Instant Oatmeal: 187 mg (19% DV) in 1 cup
Many cereals and grains are now fortified, including our favorite morning breakfast. And while the instant kind doesn’t boast the same benefits as old-fashioned rolled oats, they’re a quick breakfast option that’s full of fiber and calcium. Just choose the kinds without added sugar.

15. Orange Juice: 500 mg (50% DV) in 1 cup
In moderation, fruit juice is a perfect pairing for morning pancakes or eggs! Enjoy a tall glass for calcium and vitamin C, or pour over a salmon fillet.

16. Soymilk: 300 mg (30% DV) in 1 cup
Cows milk not your cup of tea? Soymilk is a great option for people who are lactose intolerant and contains more protein than regular milk. Pour in a morning bowl of cereal or add to coffee with some cinnamon.

17. Firm Tofu: 861 mg (86% DV) in ½ cup
We know what you’re thinking: What exactly is tofu? This meaty textured vegetarian alternative is actually made of dried soybeans that have been grounded up and boiled. It’s a great way to add lots of protein, little fat, and (of course) calcium to any meal! What’s on the dinner table tonight? Try this caramelized tofu.

18. Cheerios: 114 mg (14% DV) in 1 cup
They’re touted for helping lower cholesterol, but Cheerios also pack a significant amount of calcium into our cereal bowl. Enjoy with skim or soy milk and sliced strawberries, or in homemade trail mix for extra crunch.

Lo carb kids

Taken from ditchthecarbs.com  Since reading this I am thinking more about my daughters lunch box and trying to educate her regarding food and wheat intake. Please read this article: 

All children will benefit from lowering their carb, sugar, and wheat intake. You don’t need to be so strict with children in the healthy weight range, as they are generally more insulin sensitive than adults are, so their body can deal with sugars and carbs more efficiently. Overweight children should be controlled quite tightly. Studies have shown that children eating a ”low carb high fat’ diet, loose more weight and keep it off far better than those on a ‘calorie restricted low fat diet’.

I have written a series on Low Carb Kids. There are some great infographics and printables to help planning lunch boxes easier.

Low Carb Kids 1 – tips and tricks
Low Carb Kids 2 – printable guide to get your kids involved. How to plan you lunchbox each day.
Low Carb Kids 3 – 2 weeks of school lunches and how to plan them.
Low Carb Kids 4 – how to make a low carb lunchbox, and more Low Carb lunchbox ideas

All children will benefit from drinking less soft drinks (and energy drinks are an absolute no-no), less cakes, less sweets, less ice cream, less chips and tomato sauce (and don’t even get me started on chicken nuggets and pizza). Their bodies are growing at a rapid rate, and if we don’t feed them the nutrients they need for all the complex mechanisms that are going on inside their body, we are setting them up for a very unhealthy future. It is so sad when some children exist on litres of soft drinks, hot chips, pies, McDonalds, KFC, Subway – DAILY. Next time you see a bunch of teenagers hanging out at the mall, what are they eating? Usually some kind of takeaway washed down with an energy drink. Zero nutrition. These are beautiful growing bodies who have an addiction to high energy foods, neglect whole foods, and are probably deficient in some area. Try and really think about what your children have eaten in the last week. Make a mental note or log into My Fitness Pal and track it.

This is a great little video from the daughters of Tim Naughton, maker of ‘Fat Head Movie’. To see all their videos, see my link on You Tube.

I want to teach my children about having a healthy lifestyle –

for their bodies to be well nourished (which is different from well fed)
to be able to concentrate at school
not eating to excess
enjoying treats
eating real whole food
making good choices
enjoy trying new foods (our family rule is “you don’t have to like them, but you do have to try them”)
being active is fun
health and nutrition are a priority
Children need good FATS – they keep you full for longer, contain essential fatty acids and supply the fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K.

Children need protein – building blocks of their growing muscles.

Children need carbohydrates – but no where near what people think. Even severely restricting carbohydrates, the body can still make it through gluconeogenesis from excess protein.

Children need vegetables – fibre, vitamins, minerals, trace elements, antioxidants, phytochemicals and all the other hundreds of compounds that haven’t even been discovered yet. Fruits and vegetables should not be seen as equal. Fruit is incredibly high in carbs,especially fructose. Eat whole fruits (and never fruit juice or dried fruits), as the whole fruit contains fibre and nutrients, but don’t consider they are equal as vegetables. Be aware of the fructose content of fruit, and limit to 1 or 2 pieces a day. Go for lower sugar fruit such as berries. Cut back on high sugar tropical fruits such as pineapple, melons, grapes, etc.

How many parents do you know where they just laugh and say their children just WON’T eat vegetables. It is your responsibility as a parent to ensure they are properly nourished. It’s your convenience of not having a battle at the dinner table that allows them to refuse vegetables. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying it is easy, but establish a few family rules, one at a time, which let them know it is not negotiable. Go slowly as it may be a big change for some families. Be proud of what you have achieved. Little by little.

Our first family rule is they have to try everything. They don’t have to like it, but they have to try it
Keep introducing that food (maybe weekly) until they enjoy it, this may take forever, but you do get there
Get them to smother the food in something they do like to hide the taste (remember, they HAVE to eat some of it)
Flavour your vegetables. My children would turn up their noses at most greens until I made them silver beet carbonara, Asian greens etc. I almost cry when my youngest asks for more, a proud mum moment.
Put butter and cream cheese on the table instead of tomato sauce (way too processed and full of sugar). Let them flavour their own food. They have control and won’t battle so much.
Put twice as much of something on the plate as you know they will eat and then you can negotiate they only have to eat half (sneaky psychology, but man this one works).
Get them to choose what to go in their lunch boxes. I know what each of my children’s tastes are so make their lunchbox accordingly. I’m not saying I make totally different lunch boxes, but where one has tomatoes and feta, my youngest will have capsicum and carrots. I still add one thing a day to push them. At the moment it’s a cherry tomato each day for the boys. They know I will check each day to see if it has been eaten, if not, they have to eat it before they eat their afternoon tea.
I would say I am pretty good at what I feed them at home (all the pictures you see, are our actual meals), but I don’t restrict them in any way when they are at friends or at parties. No one likes a diet bore or a food restrictor. It would be great if other parents made good choices, but really, it’s not making up a huge part of their diet. This would be different of course if your child has a true food allergy or intolerance, but my children never have. My focus at home is always restrict the carbs and restrict poor food choices.

Eating out is a tough one. Most cafes sell cakes, muffins, donuts, sandwiches, juice, …. and sometimes there is no other choice. Thats ok, just make sure they have the best of what is there and NO juice. Save your $$$ and ask for a jug of water. Try and adapt what is on offer.

BEST LOW CARB TIP EVER!!!!

If we go to McDonalds, I always choose a small burger meal, but choose a diet coke and replace the fries with a side salad. I then open the burger and put the meat patties, sauces and cheese on top of the salad. Voila, the regular meal would have been 870 kCal, 133g carbs, my new meal is only 204kCal and 4g carbs!!!!! It just takes a bit of thinking. My children don’t drink many soft drinks but when they do I always get diet drinks if we are eating out, I know there is a lot of controversy about artificial sweeteners, but I personally choose them.

“STRIVE FOR IMPROVEMENT, NOT PERFECTION”

Rain rain go away!

Last night I met with Paul my guru and nutritionist to chat about how my first week had been

Essentially I have cut out dairy, cheese and milk, bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, wheat and corn. There have also been other factors, no carbonated drinks sugary drinks and processed foods. To be honest it hasn’t been that difficult as I have various reasons for wanting to loose some weight.

It is important though to not label this as a diet but a healthy eating plan. Which of course it is!

Unfortunately my actual weight has fluctuated a bit in the last week as I didn’t weigh myself properly but according to my own scales my progress is a loss of 3 1/2 pounds.

I do feel a bit disappointed as it I had been pretty amazing at following the plan, normally this will be one or two days for me, but I am keeping the no carbs hopefully for another couple of weeks to see where it leads.

Paul weighed me on his super duper all knowing and far too clever scales! Apart from the affirmation of my weight (bathroom scales are always wrong!!!!) the rotten things measured my BMI water levels, age and all manner of things! I did feel very shocked afterwards as my age was 64!!

As Paul said it can only get better, he has gone back 30 years since he had the scales. I need to make an impact and improve.

My key area this week is to work on my hydration levels which were pretty low so I going to make this my aim to drink more water!

Goodness only knows what they were like before I got on the special scales as I have doubled my intake this week!

Yesterday it was my sisters birthday. I did have some crips and dip (not so virtuous) and a homemade cake.

Dinner chicken and stir fry! Lovely followed by Greek yoghurt strawberries, blueberries and a plum. Greek yoghurt is better to have at nighttime. The only downer is feeling tired but I think this is due to TOH watching football until late (and falling asleep)!

Today is not so good, the sun has gone but thankfully after school the YD has no clubs! We can work on the jungle that is out garden provided it’s dry!

X