Unlocking the secrets of weight loss

If you have read my blog will know I have struggled with weight loss over the years whether it’s a lack of motivation or simply not having the will power to succeed! It’s been a long  and painful journey!

As a child born in the 60s the food I ate at home and school was very different to what is available today, my Mum was a different generation and looking back there was not the nutritional awareness or variety that we have today of food types and diet.  Whilst the food was wholesome, I think back of the staple school dinners of pies, minced beef cobbler, vegetables and sponge puddings with custard I ask myself – was it really that healthy? My generation always ate school dinners and likely Mum cooked dinner in the evening when Dad came home from work. Perhaps by today’s standards of school dinners ours  were better but perhaps not as balanced. The food we had when I was a child was mainly cooked from scratch it wasn’t the over processed and fast food of recent years. Of course school dinners are a whole other issue #jamieoliver  #schooldinners and not a topic for today’s blog 

In my days of school, food and nutrition was not a subject that was widely available. PE or games was doing the activity not Learning about how the body works or responds to exercise and nutrition. Nowadays there is the option to learn more but should more time be spent in bringing these subjects into the general curriculum?

Of course Mum gave us a balanced diet at home but was it as healthy compared to today’s standards and have those bad eating habits developped through childhood lead the way to weight gain?

My Mum often says that she survived her pregnancy on chip butties as she could not tolerate other foods. I now know that did not help me in my body make up and the way I respond to food.

So how are the secrets to weight loss actually unlocked? Interestingly in his book The Obesity Code Jason Fung explores calorie deception, the new model of obesity what is wrong with our diet and the solution (amongst other aspects)

As a failed dieter and someone whose weight has gained after each relapse I can relate totally to his writings. My weight has steadily gained and in the last few years where my work has be come exceptionally stressful I can see the impact that has on my weight. I do now go  to the gym but only 2/3 times a week – This is not ideal but an improvement on not doing anything! No exceed isle is where I’d fallen to 6 months ago when my stress levels meant I could not be bothered to do anything. I don’t overreat, my diet is healthy but I can’t seem to kick start that weight loss. 

On Monday TOH and I decide to break the code with the suggested intermittent fasting. Monday was a total fast day and I have to say I was pleasantly surprised. I did it, it wasn’t as difficult as I thought it would be! Tuesday I ate simply and to suggestions in the book and today Wednesday is another fast day. Ideally Friday I should fast too but I have a work BBQ so maybe just an evening meal! My aim is to try to follow the plan for 4 weeks doing the 36 hour fast protocol, i.e. fasting on 3 days a week to reset my homeostasis, my insulin levels and my body! Watch this space, please send your positive energy to my for success and I will report back to you!

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Burn fat with fat

JsMe  

Love this article shared…..

” A recent article has a few take home points that I would contend. The article suggests that eating before a workout is critical so that the body stays away from cannibalizing its own muscle the moment you break a sweat. Additionally, it suggests that the body strictly burns sugar for energy. Finally, the article proposes that stocking up on sugars prior to exercise is the answer to avoid bonking. Sounds like the traditional line from the typical performance nutrition “expert” who has neglected to understand the real story behind pre-workout fueling. Lets review the facts about fueling the body as I explain my points of contention. 

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT HOW THE BODY IS FUELED

The body has an alternative, more efficient and effective fuel source other than sugars: fat! 

When you load up on carbs before activity, the body will choose the sugar every time.

This means that your body never has a chance to get into a state of fat burn. It’s amazing to me that everyone who breaks a sweat during a workout is in some way motivated by burning fat, but so many insist fueling with sugar. 

Burning primarily sugar for fuel is a devastating error in the quest to shed body fat. Not only does it mean that you limit your chances of torching body fat but the cost of running on sugar at the cellular level is much greater than the cost of burning fat. The article at the root of this discussion suggests that ATP is a naturally occurring energy source in the body. ATP is indeed the currency of energy in the body but saying it is “naturally occurring” is misleading. It is produced by converting either sugar or fat into a usable energy source.

ATP is indeed the currency of energy in the body but saying it is “naturally occurring” is misleading.

Dumping out your piggybank of carbs or fats at your body’s cash register and expecting your body to give you energy in return would be like dumping your piggybank of american coins and dollars on the counter of a store in Canada. They are going to ask you to convert your American dollars into Canadian currency before making the sale. The point is that the body requires you take your carbs (sugars) and fats to the bank for exchange into the proper currency. The bank is your cell (specifically the Proton Pump) and the proper currency for usable energy is ATP. 

TAKE NOTES – THIS IS BIG

You get taxed on converting sugars into ATP differently than you get taxed on converting fat. Within the cell, during the conversion of sugar into ATP there are three compounds of Carbon Dioxide that are produced as a byproduct of the conversion process. When you bring fat to the cell to be converted into ATP only two compounds of CO2 are produced as a byproduct of the conversion process.

In other words the tax on converting sugar to ATP is 30% greater than when you convert fat into ATP. CO2 makes the cellular environment more acidic. A more acidic cell sounds to me like something to avoid, but here’s exactly why it’s the opposite of good: the lower pH environment in the cell results in less ATP production by the Proton Pump. Less ATP equals less available fuel or energy. 
See the Proton Pump pumping out ATP (gold nuggets) in this cellular animation video from 1:10 – 1:30:

SOLUTION

Direct your body towards burning your own body fat for energy. Eating cereal and “energy bars” before exercise is not the way. Eating primarily healthy fats and proteins no sooner than 2-4 hours prior to exercise and pumping the brakes on the carbs until after the gym is one way. Taking in the healthy fats more regularly trains your cells how to use fat for fuel more efficiently. The post-training carbs will top-off any depleted glycogen stores just in case you ever need them. Only thing is you may not need them very often if you are regularly burning fat for fuel – converting fat into energy equals more gold nuggets of ATP available to do more work with! 

TAKE TO THE TRENCHES

Start slow and give this a try before your less intense, shorter workout days to get used to it. Keep in mind that unless you are hungry there is no law that says you must eat before you break a sweat. Assuming your goal is fat burn then exercising on an empty stomach is one way to become a fat burning machine!

IF YOU LIKED WHAT YOU READ HERE, BE SURE TO SHARE IT.  

@tdathletesedge #paleo #paleodiet #crossfit #TDAE

Tim DiFrancesco, PT, DPT, ATC, CSCS is the Head Strength & Conditioning Coach for the Los Angeles Lakers and President of TD Athletes Edge, where he provides fitness, recovery and nutrition guidance to aspiring and professional athletes. For training advice, visit http://www.tdathletesedge.com and follow him on Twitter/Instagram through @tdathletesedge. 

References:

Powering the Cell: Mitochondria [Motion picture]. (n.d.). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RrS2uROUjK4.
Special thanks to Dr. Cate Shanahan and Luke Shanahan for helping me to explore the goldmine that is the Proton Pump.”

Have I really found my mojo?

When you have a considerable amount of weight to lose its easy to give up, not stay focused and make up excuses. I think I have been doing that for the last 23 years! My eldest child is 23 and really since that pregnancy I have not worried about my weight. Maybe not worrying isn’t the right thing to say as I was lucky enough to play lots of sport which kept my weight down, I ate normally but not excessively I worked in London and I would have toast for breakfast and then a sandwich and snack for lunch and whatever evening meal I fancied. I didn’t really think about weight I wasn’t super slim just average (I would love to be there now) some things were tight on me but I never slimmed into clothes.

I did go on a diet after having my son and probably lost a stone That was with weight watchers. Thinking back that’s probably the only time I have ever been successful at a slimmimg. Club and got to target. The trouble is staying there!

Thinking about why this has been the case over the last few weeks has been a revelation to me. I think It’s so much to do with confidence. My first marriage broke down when my son was coming up to 8 years old but for 3-4 years before that I was not happy in myself and with the relationship. 

I didn’t feel valued or confident and that’s when I will have a few extra wines pick at food etc… 

After that breakdown I crashed with another unsuccessful relationship and breakdown and now bear the burden of feeling guilty from the effects of that breakdown! The blessing was a lovely child but sadly for her she didn’t have her parents together. Just feeling good about myself did not come naturally.

It’s easy to blame others for your problems and difficulties and not address the issue of your weight gain and I think that is something I have buried.  I haven’t wanted to face it, well the underlying unhappiness which I think is part or the cause. Well I have faced it and need to do something about it for me! I need to feel confident that I can be successful on this journey. 

Acknowledgingi that it will be a journey is important as I need to realise this won’t be a quick fix but may take a year or more.  God knows it took 23 years to get here!

So I have read a lot of books, diet plans and articles.

 What is key in so much of the celebrity articles is that X has lost so much weight in a certain time and they have lots of energy but what they fail to mention is they probably had a dietician, cook and personal trainer helping them.  Your average Jane doesn’t have that support or unlimted funds so I am going to do this but my way and with luck this time I will be successful.
The principles I will be taking with me on this journey and food plans to follow for the first months at least is trying to steer clear of traditional processed carbs, bread, cereals, pasta rice etc? I do cook from scratch but my aim is to to eat cleanly.
So to report on my initial days

Day one I haven’t been shopping in a while so had to make do. I had 2 hard boiled eggs for breakfast. Took an apple to work for a snack and homemade soup for lunch.

The soup was made in a new soup maker (fantastic buy) with 1 onion, 2 sweetpotatoes, a red pepper, a chilli and 2 slices of butternut squash cut into chunks. All veg peeled and chopped. I had a hearty bowl of soup! 

When I got home after the school run I went to my gym and did a short spin class for 30 minutes then came home (from small acorns!)

Diner was simple I chopped 2 onions, a pepper, courgette, half an aubergine and again a couple of slices of squash onto an oiled tray (olive oil) seasoned and put over herbs cooked for 30 minutes and had with a small seasoned Turkey breast.

Desert was some Greek yoghurt, not lo fat with defrosted cherries.

Oh and I did make another soup for today, curried squash with onion and a red pepper, I had a bowl of it too

!Feeling inspired!

#healthyeating #recipes

Fat bombs!

Shared from Howikis

Make a fat bomb for your weightloss
Edited by Ian Gabriel T. Tolledo, Maria, Lynn, Marian Raquel F. Roncesvalles and 2 others

Fat bomb: What is it and how does it work?

1. Fat bombs are snacks/foods which contain high concentration of fat.
Oftentimes, fat bombs are consumed by people who are on a low-carb diet, which prompts them to eat fat bombs as an alternative.

2. Ultimately, fat is our body’s main source of energy, it is the preferred fuel for human metabolism.
Actually, people only require minimal amounts of glucose (sugar), most of which are supplied by our liver regularly.

3. Fats are essential nutrients for a healthy body.
Our adipose tissue (stored fat), gives cushioning and insulation to our body’s internal organs aside from protecting nerves and moving vitamins throughout the body.

4. It may surprise you, but fat is our largest reserve of energy available for any activity.
Fat is stored automatically by our bodies when we consume more calories than we should. Ever wonder why fat was more desirable than a slim body during the ancient times? Because come winter or famine, those fat reserves can be used to nourish the body.

5. People prepare fat bombs for diverse personal reasons, some of those reasons are:

Extra energy during an athletic activity.
Energy source when dieting.
Alternative snack option.
Leisure and fun (for some)

6. If properly used and consumed, fat bombs can help greatly in losing weight, maintaining overall health, or holding your carb and protein cravings at bay.

Chocolate fat bombs
These are the most common kind of fat bomb, and if you’re new to this, I suggest you try this recipe first.

Ingredients
3/4 cup melted coconut oil
150g melted salted butter
60 drops liquid Stevia
150g almond butter
50g cocop
Cayenne Pepper (optional) FYI – spicy food makes you sweat more, and aids when you’re dieting.

Instructions

1. Stir all ingredients in a big bowl, making sure that it is all mixed well together.

2. Put the mixture into small cake holders (cupcake, muffin, etc).

3. Put into the freezer for half an hour.

You can also keep your fat bombs in the freezer if you want.

This batch’ content would be 91 percent fat, 5 percent carbs and only 4 percent protein. Of course you could try putting other ingredients that you want in the mix. Some suggestions are nuts, cream, honey, vanilla extract, cocoa nibs from cocoa plants, dried fruits, etc.

From me! I made some fat bombs yesterday. Just to see what they tasted like. The recipe I used was a bit different

Ingredients:

185 grams coconut oil
50 grams nut butter (almond or macadamia)
4 to 6 teaspoons xylitol or equivalent sweetness using stevia (sweeten to taste)
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
125 grams unsalted butter
pinch of salt
1 tablespoon vanilla extract/essence
Method:

Melt all ingredients together in a pot. I left the nut butter till last to create a swirl effect.
Cool mixture slightly and pour into ice-cube trays or silicone moulds.
Put into freezer to set for a few hours.

My problem was I used salted butter as its all I had so the bombs tasted a little salty and the almond butter was probably a bit old and didn’t melt and stayed in a lump so I had to remove it. Once frozen the coconut oil rose to the top and doesn’t look to nice! I will persevere and adapt the recipe and maybe check out the Banting site for some more details. I think maybe some double cream would be nice or maybe the first recipe on this page as not so much coconut oil! TOH had a couple and found them quite filling!

Is sugar making you fat?

Since being more aware of what I am eating it’s shocking what you can discover!

“This generation of children will lead shorter lifespans of their parents, sugar has been pumped into so many low fat foods, the USDA has an inherent conflict of interest when it comes to US agriculture and setting dietary guidelines, big food doesn’t necessarily want us to know what we are eating, labels don’t tell the whole story, marketing to children is basically coopting their brains and wiring them at a very early age and we can actually do something about all of these things.” – Katic Couric (1a)

Katie Couric journalist, author and talk-show host is executive producer of her recent documentary ‘Fed Up,’ directed written and produced by Stephanie Soechtig a documentary which illustrates how sugar is impacting the health and well-being of American society. America is not alone, with obesity rates in Australia tipping near 30%, 31% in New Zealand, Canada is pushing near 25%, in Europe 23% of women and 20% of men are obese. These figures do not include the percentage of overweight people within these countries which pushes these numbers significantly higher. In some cases the combined percentage of populations that are either overweight or obese is almost 70%. For example in the UK 67% of men and 57% of women are either overweight or obese. Sarah Wilson’s I Quit Sugar website outlines some of the health risks of high sugar diets and has links to some of the studies and research undertaken around sugar and high fructose corn syrup. Some of these include: sugar ages the body and causes wrinkles, increased risk of heart disease, increasing the risk of cancer and sugar increases your risk of diabetes A retrospective, worldwide study found small increases in sugar can lead to significant increases in diabetes rates. The white stuff makes you fat, a meta-analysis study published in the British Medical Journal shows increased sugar intake is significantly associated with weight gain and an increased risk of obesity in children having just one sweetened drink per day.(1)

‘Fed Up’ premiered at the Sundance Film Festival this year which suggested Sugar may be the New Cigarettes? Fed Up traces back the last 35 years and makes a convincing case that big business is to blame. (When isn’t it?) The food industry responded to the McGovern Report by flooding the grocery aisles with “healthy” chips, cookies, drinks and cereals that cut fat while quietly upping the sugar. Since then, sugar consumption has doubled. It’s not because we’re pounding down the pound cakes — a breakfast of orange juice and a bowl of processed cereal maxes out our ideal sugar intake for the rest of the day. Sugar increases insulin, insulin increases fat storage. And it’s addictive. In a study Soechtig quotes, 93 percent of lab rats chose sugar water over cocaine. At this rate, in twenty years, 95 percent of the population will be obese, a crisis that affects every aspect of our country’s stability from health care spending to national defense. A group of retired military leaders is so alarmed by our out-of-shape society that they’ve issued a warning study called “Too Fat to Fight.” At that point in the screening, the slender actresses to the right of me tsk-tsked, but then Fed Up dropped a bomb: 40 percent of thin people are also fat, their internal organs padded with enough damaging blubber that they may as well be clinically obese. Behold, our new national paranoia: TOFI, or Thin Outside, Fat Inside. (2)

“The Government is subsidizing the obesity epidemic.” – Michael Pollan
Fed Up shows how the first dietary guidelines issued by the U.S. government 30 years ago overlooked the role of dietary sugar in increasing risks of obesity, diabetes, and associated ill-health outcomes, particularly in children. Since these guidelines effectively condoned unlimited addition of sugar to foods consumed by children, sugar consumption has greatly increased, obesity has skyrocketed, and generations of children have grown up far fatter than their parents. These children face impaired health and shorter lifespans as a result. The film upends the conventional wisdom of why we gain weight and lays bare the misinformation put forth on how to lose it. It reveals that far more of the American public gets sick from what they eat than anyone realized. The film traces the history of processed foods adding dangerous levels of sugar and sweeteners to their roster of ingredients. (It began in the late 1970s with the rise of low-fat foods and has intensified since then.) Doctors bemoan the rise of adult-onset diabetes in young children, as well as children suffering strokes and heart attacks at a very young age, due to their excessive intake of sugar.(3)

“There are 600,000 food items in America, 80% of them have added sugar.” – Dr Robert Lustig
“Fed Up” is a mixture of in-the-life coverage and a roster of talking heads that include former President Bill Clinton. Soechtig spent two years with a group of kids, documenting their efforts to improve their health through dieting and exercise. The tragedy, her film argues, is that the pervasiveness of the food industry and the misinformation it disseminates has stacked all the odds against them. Personal responsibility and freedom of choice has always been Big Food’s counter to accusations of public endangerment, but if the American people has been so intricately misled, where is the personal freedom to make the right decision for one’s health? If “Fed Up” is persuasive and passionate enough in making its argument, it could lead to a huge difference in how we view healthy consumption. (4)

Article by Andrew Martin editor of onenesspublishing and author of One ~ A Survival Guide for the Future…

Sources

(1a) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tHq4_a0y9U

(1) http://iquitsugar.com/science/

(2) http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2014/01/fed-up-sugar-documentary.php

(3)http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2014/01/29/katie-couric-documentary/5019841/

(4) http://www.indiewire.com/article/sundance-curiosities-will-fed-up-be-the-last-straw-for-americas-food-industry

Country Obesity Statistics

http://www.heartfoundation.org.au/SiteCollectionDocuments/Factsheet-Overweight-and-obesity.pdf

http://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/obesity

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/canada-s-obesity-rates-triple-in-less-than-30-years-1.2558365

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/may/29/uk-western-europe-obesity-study

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-624-x/2014001/article/11922-eng.htm#a7

http://www.euro.who.int/en/health-topics/noncommunicable-diseases/obesity/data-and-statistics

Is eating fat good for you?

An article that may be of interest.

Eating fat is good for you: Doctors change their minds after 40 years
A DIET packed with fat is the healthy way to prevent heart disease, a leading British expert has claimed.
By: Jo Willey Wed, October 23, 2013

After 40 years of cutting fat from our diet, doctors may now be turning their advice on its head [GETTY]
Cardiologist Dr Aseem Malhotra says the obsession with a low-fat diet has “paradoxically increased” the risk of heart disease.

Other experts have added their voices to his controversial call to end 40 years of advice to cut saturated fat – which has been described as “the greatest medical error of our time”.

They claim the guidance has left millions of people at risk of developing cardiovascular ­disease and “led to the over-medication of millions of people with statins”.

The public could just as effectively protect themselves by eating “real” food such as butter, milk and cheese and adopting the Mediterranean diet.

Dr Malhotra, an interventional cardiology specialist registrar at Croydon University Hospital, London, slammed the routine prescriptions of statins and claimed a diet high in saturated fats could be three times more effective at lowering cholesterol.

Writing on bmj.com, he said a preoccupation with levels of total cholesterol “has diverted our attention” from the worse risks of a condition known as atherogenic ­dyslipidaemia, which is an unfavourable ratio of blood fats.

He said saturated fat has been demonised since the 1970s when a landmark study found a link between coronary heart disease and total ­cholesterol, which correlated with the percentage of calories provided by saturated fat.

He said: “But correlation is not causation. Nevertheless, we were advised to cut fat intake to 30 per cent of total energy and a fall in saturated fat to 10 per cent.”

Some doctors claim a diet high in fat could help to lower cholesterol (PIC POSED BY MODEL) [GETTY]

Lowering cholesterol, by whatever means, lowers risk

Professor Peter Weissberg, of the British Heart Foundation
But recent studies “have not supported any significant association between saturated fat intake and risk of cardiovascular disease” and saturated fat has actually been found to be protective.

A Journal of the American Medical Association study recently revealed that a “low fat” diet showed the greatest drop in energy expenditure and increased insulin resistance – which is a precursor to diabetes – compared with a low carbohydrate and low glycaemic index (GI) diet.

Dr Malhotra refers to the United States, where obesity has rocketed despite the percentage of calorie consumption from fat falling from 40 per cent to 30 per cent in the past 30 years. One reason is that the food industry “compensated by replacing saturated fat with added sugar”.

He says eight million Britons take statins yet there has been no major impact on heart disease trends.

Adopting a Mediterranean diet largely based on vegetables, fruits, beans, whole grains, olive oil and fish after a heart attack is almost three times as powerful in reducing mortality as taking a statin, he says.

“Doctors need to embrace prevention as well as treatment. The greatest improvements in morbidity and mortality have been due not to personal responsibility but rather to public health,” he said. “It is time to bust the myth of the role of saturated fat in heart disease and wind back the harms of dietary advice that has contributed to obesity.”

It seems a Mediterranean diet could be three times more power in reducing mortality than statins [GETTY]

Commenting on Dr Malhotra’s article, Timothy Noakes, a professor at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, said: “Focusing on an elevated blood cholesterol concentration as the exclusive cause of coronary heart disease is unquestionably the worst medical error of our time.

“After reviewing all the scientific evidence I draw just one conclusion – never prescribe a statin drug for a loved one.”

Professor David Haslam, chair of the National Obesity Forum, said: “The assumption has been made that increased fat in the bloodstream is caused by increased saturated fat in the diet, whereas modern evidence is proving that refined carbohydrates and sugar in particular are actually the culprits.”

Professor Peter Weissberg, of the British Heart Foundation, said: “Lowering cholesterol, by whatever means, lowers risk. Cholesterol levels can be influenced by diet, exercise and drugs, in particular statins.

“There is clear evidence that patients who have had a heart attack, or are at high risk of one, can benefit from taking a statin. This needs to be combined with a balanced diet, not smoking and taking regular exercise.”

Mmmm all food for thought……