Unlocking the secrets of weight loss

If you have read my blog will know I have struggled with weight loss over the years whether it’s a lack of motivation or simply not having the will power to succeed! It’s been a long  and painful journey!

As a child born in the 60s the food I ate at home and school was very different to what is available today, my Mum was a different generation and looking back there was not the nutritional awareness or variety that we have today of food types and diet.  Whilst the food was wholesome, I think back of the staple school dinners of pies, minced beef cobbler, vegetables and sponge puddings with custard I ask myself – was it really that healthy? My generation always ate school dinners and likely Mum cooked dinner in the evening when Dad came home from work. Perhaps by today’s standards of school dinners ours  were better but perhaps not as balanced. The food we had when I was a child was mainly cooked from scratch it wasn’t the over processed and fast food of recent years. Of course school dinners are a whole other issue #jamieoliver  #schooldinners and not a topic for today’s blog 

In my days of school, food and nutrition was not a subject that was widely available. PE or games was doing the activity not Learning about how the body works or responds to exercise and nutrition. Nowadays there is the option to learn more but should more time be spent in bringing these subjects into the general curriculum?

Of course Mum gave us a balanced diet at home but was it as healthy compared to today’s standards and have those bad eating habits developped through childhood lead the way to weight gain?

My Mum often says that she survived her pregnancy on chip butties as she could not tolerate other foods. I now know that did not help me in my body make up and the way I respond to food.

So how are the secrets to weight loss actually unlocked? Interestingly in his book The Obesity Code Jason Fung explores calorie deception, the new model of obesity what is wrong with our diet and the solution (amongst other aspects)

As a failed dieter and someone whose weight has gained after each relapse I can relate totally to his writings. My weight has steadily gained and in the last few years where my work has be come exceptionally stressful I can see the impact that has on my weight. I do now go  to the gym but only 2/3 times a week – This is not ideal but an improvement on not doing anything! No exceed isle is where I’d fallen to 6 months ago when my stress levels meant I could not be bothered to do anything. I don’t overreat, my diet is healthy but I can’t seem to kick start that weight loss. 

On Monday TOH and I decide to break the code with the suggested intermittent fasting. Monday was a total fast day and I have to say I was pleasantly surprised. I did it, it wasn’t as difficult as I thought it would be! Tuesday I ate simply and to suggestions in the book and today Wednesday is another fast day. Ideally Friday I should fast too but I have a work BBQ so maybe just an evening meal! My aim is to try to follow the plan for 4 weeks doing the 36 hour fast protocol, i.e. fasting on 3 days a week to reset my homeostasis, my insulin levels and my body! Watch this space, please send your positive energy to my for success and I will report back to you!

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#banting #NSNG #LCHF #healthyeating #weightloss

Taken from:
101 Banting Pointers by Martie Nel

An overview of how Banting works and valuable information for new banters, you cannot get to your destination if you do not know the plan!!!

1. This is not a “diet” on which you go on and come off after weightloss. It’s not a quick fix diet. Eating the ‘Banting’ way which means a Low Carb High Fat diet is a lifestyle. It becomes the new normal way of eating for you.

2. Banting is not for everyone. If you are not carbohydrate intolerant, you probably won’t lose weight. If you have always been lean and metabolised carbohydrates well, you may not benefit from changing to LCHF.

3. One of the signs of being carbohydrate intolerant include getting drowsy after eating food containing carbs or sugar – usually about 2 hours after eating. Most times this occurs after lunch – in the middle of the afternoon.

4. If you are sensitive to carbohydrates, you will most probably gain weight around your waist and not your hips and thighs.

5. If your weight goes up and down a lot, you most probably will benefit from changing your diet to a LCHF way of life.

6. Carbohydrates are addictive, so if you are carb intolerant you will find yourself reaching for them more and more, even though you are no longer hungry.

7. If you are a habitual snacker or emotional eater, you probably are sensitive to carbs and should follow the Banting way.

8. If obesity and weight gain around the waist run is something that your parents or grandparents struggled with, you most probably will struggle with it too. A lifestyle of low carbs will benefit you.

9. What’s your favourite food? If the answer is cake or carbs, you most probably are addicted and could be carbohydrate intolerant.

10. If there is diabetes in your family, you are at high risk for being insulin resistant and need to cut back on sugar and starch.

11. Premenstrual tension improves when you cut out carbs and sugar.

12. Starting the day by drinking two glasses of water on an empty stomach can help in weight loss and helps prevent constipation.

13. Eating a LCHF diet is not permission to eat as much as you want. You still need to employ some calorie counting, appetite control.

14. Before eating, think about exactly how you are feeling. The process of eating actually starts in the mind. Ask yourself if you are hungry, thirsty, bored, emotional. Eat when you when you are hungry – stop when you are full.

15. The core principle of Banting is eating real food. These foods are foods that satisfy and they are the ones you want to focus on.

16. Probably, the most beneficial food to add to your diet is one that contains all the nutrients, enzymes and protein to create a living creature – that’s a simple chicken egg. It’s a power packed high protein food bomb designed to enhance your health.

17. Eating foods that are high in protein and fat are the answer to hunger satisfaction.

18. When you fill up on carbohydrates such as bread, cereal and refined sugar laden pastries, you may feel full but that soon wears off and you can find yourself snacking all – day – long.

19. Make sure you start your day with high protein and high fat foods. These include eggs, bacon, sausage, berries, full cream, double thick natural Greek yoghurt, avocado.

20. Leave off the menu overt carbs such as rice, potatoes, pasta & bread.

21. Replace sweet dessert with strawberries and cream.

22. One of the biggest challenges to controlling appetite is food cupboards & fridges stocked with tempting treats, guaranteed to ambush any attempt at resistance. If it’s there, you will eat it.

23. Get rid of the high carb, high sugar items in your home – biscuits, rusks, ice cream, sweets, cake, chocolate bars. Don’t buy the stuff in the first place.

24. Don’t go shopping when you are hungry – that also leads to temptation of buying a quick snack to curb your hunger pangs.

25. Replace the carbs in your home with options you can eat – salad ingredients, cheese, olives, raw nuts, biltong sticks, berries, cream.

26. Continually be aware that you must eat when you are hungry, and not when you are bored, stressed, thirsty or tired.

27. Keep Occupied. If you are busy with a project that takes up time, energy and interest, you’ll find food suddenly takes a secondary place in your life.

28. Instead of constantly thinking about food, you’ll start thinking about something else. Find your passion and start working on it. It may be people, or music, or writing or it may even be food!

29. If food is your passion, start researching the healthy foods that will enhance your life and not make you sluggish.

30. If you find yourself bored and needing something to do to prevent yourself from eating for the sake of having nothing else to do, go for a walk, do a puzzle, read a book, visit a friend.

31. Stay Hydrated. Replace fizzy drinks & alcohol with water. You don’t need to drink soda to be refreshed.

32. Carry a bottle of water with you and drink to thirst. If you have water handy, you won’t be tempted to eat if it’s fluid you need. Some say to drink a glass of water before eating also helps prevent overeating at a meal.

33. If you are carbohydrate intolerant, make sure you also cut back on fruit, as it is a primary source of sugar. Limit yourself to one serving a day, preferably strawberries.

34. Fish is a great Banting food and it suits non-Banters too. Tuna, salmon, hake, haddock, yellowtail, sardines – all great protein foods that will satisfy you and keep your blood sugar levels stable.

35. Avoid: bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, cous cous – no overt carbs at all eg cake, pizza, rusks, muffins, etc! No peanuts.

36. There are nuts you can eat: macadamia, almonds, cashew (avoid salted and roasted), pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, flaxseed soil (Prof Tim says it really helps with raised blood pressure).

37. All vegetables grown above the ground are Banting friendly, specially leafy greens, like spinach, broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage.

38. Gem squash, baby marrows are good as well as lots of salad laden with lettuce, cherry tomatoes, red pepper, carrots, mushrooms.

39. When it comes to dairy, aim for high fat products. Full cream (double if you like) Greek (unsweetened, unflavoured) yoghurt. Once you are off sugar, you will love it. Cream! I put cream on my breakfast and in my coffee. It’s great. Full cream milk. Cheese, Eggs. Butter (ditch margarine – more about that later).

40. However, too much dairy may hinder weight loss, so find a balance with how much you eat.

41. LCHF eating has got to become a way of life. By eating LCHF, you may find you lose weight quickly, which if you need to, is great, but for your health, you should view it as a marathon and not a sprint.

42. Some people are thrilled at the idea that they can have seemingly unlimited fat, but don’t be misled by what that means. To start with, it doesn’t mean you can eat anything that you think is ‘fattening.’ Cake is fattening. You have to learn the difference between fat and carbohydrates.

43. Carbohydrates (including sugar) are found in almost everything we eat. They are there in differing amounts. Some are high in carbs – others low. Learn to read the labels on the food you buy.

44. Most ‘health’ products that come in tins for making up of meal substitute ‘shakes’ are high in carbohydrate.

45. Most weight loss programmes that include “low fat” anything, are high in carbohydrate.

46. All ‘low fat’ products in the store fridges or on the shelves are high in carbohydrate. Avoid them!

47. Carbohydrate makes you fat! Fat doesn’t.

48. The basic principle is that when you eat a stack of carbs, your body uses those carbs for energy and stores the fat you eat…. where does it store it? Around your waist! The ‘beer belly’, the ‘big gut’ – that’s where the fat is stored.

49. To get rid of that fat, stop eating carbohydrates. Eat more good fat in your diet, so the body uses the fat for energy.

50. Almost all food contains some carbs, so that’s why this lifestyle is LOW CARB, because you cannot get away from eating some carbs.

51. When it comes to oils, watch what you buy. Olive oil, avocado oil and coconut oil are the ones you want.

52. Sunflower oil is out!

53. Fry food using butter. Olive oil undergoes an unhealthy change when heated beyond a certain temperature. Dump margarine altogether. Butter is better.

54. There are enough foods in the LCHF/Banting shopping basket to keep you satisfied. One of the great things about LCHF is you don’t go hungry. The onus is on you to do the research.

55. When you pick something up in the supermarket that is packaged, read the label to see how much carbohydrate it contains per 100g. You’re aiming for food stuff that contains less than 7g/100g. The less the better.

56. The average person is aiming for about 50g of carbs per day. If you are diabetic, maybe even less.

57. If you find you have reduced carbs to 50g per day and you are sluggish and lacking energy, clearly you need more! On the converse, if you find you are eating 50g carbs per day and not losing weight, clearly you need less. What works for others, may not work for you.

58. Eating the Banting way is essential for diabetics and that’s been proven by a Swedish study. Another study says that eating low carb diet is best for treating both type 1 and type 2 diabetics.

59. Artificial sweetner is no encouraged in this lifestyle. It is believed that non-caloric sweeteners still contribute to increasing hunger and result in a continued craving for sweet food.

60. What is surprising is that the pancreas starts secreting insulin at the anticipation of sugar arriving, so when no sugar comes, the blood sugar level drops and hunger pangs begin.

61. Beer promotes fat storage as it contains more than alcohol. It also have fast digesting carbs, resulting in a rush of insulin and a rise in blood sugar level. It promotes fat storage around the belly – hence the term ‘beer bop’.

62. Red or dry white wine does not have the same effect as beer because they contain less sugar and carbohydrate. Be careful though, too much alcohol will slow weight loss.

63. Babies should not be raised on carbohydrates. The development of their brain requires fat and protein.

64. When starting a baby on solids, avoid baby cereals and baby food that is laden with sugar. Rather process your own vegetables and meat and feed them that.

65. Children who are obese at a young age are most likely already carbohydrate resistant and will benefit from changing to Low Carb lifestyle.

66. A great breakfast for school going children is bacon and eggs with sausage and and perhaps even some of the previous night’s protein. That will be sure to see them through to lunchtime.

67. The reason why children get fat is not because they have occasional sweet snacks for a treat over their birthday or Christmas, but rather that we are filling their lunchboxes with sugary treats, which falsely suggest they useful for energy.

68. Lunchbox treats for children could include biltong, dry wors, boiled eggs, cheese or nuts and seeds. Replace sandwiches with seed crackers.

69. Embracing a LCHF lifestyle during pregnancy is absolutely possible. In fact it is probably beneficial and may even prevent gestational diabetes and extra weight gain.

70. Ditch margarine. Use butter. Why? Butter is made from cow’s milk. The fatty part of cow’s milk is churned until it becomes butter! End of story. Margarine is made with vegetable oil, which is liquid at room temperature. To make it harder it has to be processed and this is done by ‘hydrogenation.’ Hydrogenated fat is bad for you.

71. Margarine also contains colourants, emulsifiers and other artificial ingredients.

72. Butter is high in calories and if you need to watch your calorie intake, you may prefer to use olive oil as a butter substitute.

73. It is becoming known that animal fats do not influence your cholesterol as much as previously believed. If you have a familial history of high cholesterol, you do need to watch your intake of dietary cholesterol.

74. Banting is a low carbohydrate and high fat way of eating. It is not high protein, but rather moderate protein.

75. Best foods to eat are those that grow on a tree or plant and look like what they are.

76. Try to avoid anything that it is in a box, a tin, or a packet. If it has a long shelf life, it’s probably loaded with preservatives.

77. If you want to get a good idea as to whether you are pre-diabetic ask your GP to test your HBA1c. It measures the percentage of glucose in your blood over the last 3 months. Drive for 5%.

78. Don’t be afraid of fat – the fat of grass-fed free range animals is fine to eat.

79. When choosing food, choose from free range organic variety.

80. Try not to snack. It’s easy to do when you are bored. Train yourself not to.

81. Don’t eat when you are not hungry!

82. Cut sugar out of your diet. Do not add it to tea or coffee. Drink water instead of fizzy drinks laden with either sugar or aspartane! It’s amazing how your taste buds adjust – very soon you learn to appreciate the real taste of natural food.

83. Honey is sugar – avoid it.

84. We tend to eat far more than is necessary to sustain us. When you have got your appetite under control, you will discover that you can live energetically without grazing through the day. In fact, you will discover two meals a day perfectly sustainable.

85. Most people are attracted to a LCHF lifestyle because the hope it will result in weight loss, but that’s not the only reward. Cutting out sugar results in much clearer skin. Stomach ailments such as pre-ulcers have been known to clear up. Irritable Bowel Syndrome is helped by the diet and skin irritations such as eczema have also been seen to improve.

86. You don’t get hungry eating LCHF – the food is filling and the lifestyle sustainable.

87. Use full cream in tea or coffee instead of milk to cut down on the amount of sugar.

88. Bullet proof coffee usually is 1 tablespoon of unsalted butter melted with 1 tablespoon of coconut oil, whisked well and added to a cup of black coffee. Guarantee to give you a boost that will last several hours.

89. For baking, look out for almond flour or coconut flour as low carb substitutes for wheat flour.

90. Make use of cauliflower to make cauli-rice or cauli-mash to substitute for rice and mashed potato.

91. You can also use cauliflower mashed with a little almond flour to create a pizza base.

92. It’s very difficult to get your head around the idea of going through life without cake – let it be a treat from time to time and not a weekly event.

93. Dark chocolate is acceptable – the darker the better, so aim for 70% at least and none of the flavoured varieties.

94. Regular peanut butter is loaded with sugar and processed (in sunflower oil) peanuts, so it’s off the Banting list. Do look out for macadamia nut butter or you can even try and make your own by processing macadamia nuts until they are smooth and ‘spreadable’. Then at least you will know what you are eating!

95. Fruit is laden with sugar so use it sparingly. But a nice lunchtime snack, is two thin slices of apple, spread with macadamia nut butter and a piece of cheese.

96. Keep left over dinner meat for breakfast the next day.

97. Try and find a dietician who follows this lifestyle – go for at least one consultation to assess your needs.

98. Expect some opposition if you start eating this lifestyle. Not everyone believes that it is beneficial. Be patient and find common ground that everyone can enjoy such as Greek salads, vegetable dishes, fish, ostrich meat and meals using avocados, olives and feta cheese.

99. Do as much research as you can online to find recipes and new exciting creative Banting meals.

100. Eating this way takes some initial discipline to be successful. Once you have seen the results and renewed energy, you will be more motivated to continue

101. LCHF/ Banting eating is individual to each and every person who tries it. Each of us are unique. There is balance to be had in embracing this eating plan. You are responsible for finding it. 

Burn fat with fat

JsMe  

Love this article shared…..

” A recent article has a few take home points that I would contend. The article suggests that eating before a workout is critical so that the body stays away from cannibalizing its own muscle the moment you break a sweat. Additionally, it suggests that the body strictly burns sugar for energy. Finally, the article proposes that stocking up on sugars prior to exercise is the answer to avoid bonking. Sounds like the traditional line from the typical performance nutrition “expert” who has neglected to understand the real story behind pre-workout fueling. Lets review the facts about fueling the body as I explain my points of contention. 

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT HOW THE BODY IS FUELED

The body has an alternative, more efficient and effective fuel source other than sugars: fat! 

When you load up on carbs before activity, the body will choose the sugar every time.

This means that your body never has a chance to get into a state of fat burn. It’s amazing to me that everyone who breaks a sweat during a workout is in some way motivated by burning fat, but so many insist fueling with sugar. 

Burning primarily sugar for fuel is a devastating error in the quest to shed body fat. Not only does it mean that you limit your chances of torching body fat but the cost of running on sugar at the cellular level is much greater than the cost of burning fat. The article at the root of this discussion suggests that ATP is a naturally occurring energy source in the body. ATP is indeed the currency of energy in the body but saying it is “naturally occurring” is misleading. It is produced by converting either sugar or fat into a usable energy source.

ATP is indeed the currency of energy in the body but saying it is “naturally occurring” is misleading.

Dumping out your piggybank of carbs or fats at your body’s cash register and expecting your body to give you energy in return would be like dumping your piggybank of american coins and dollars on the counter of a store in Canada. They are going to ask you to convert your American dollars into Canadian currency before making the sale. The point is that the body requires you take your carbs (sugars) and fats to the bank for exchange into the proper currency. The bank is your cell (specifically the Proton Pump) and the proper currency for usable energy is ATP. 

TAKE NOTES – THIS IS BIG

You get taxed on converting sugars into ATP differently than you get taxed on converting fat. Within the cell, during the conversion of sugar into ATP there are three compounds of Carbon Dioxide that are produced as a byproduct of the conversion process. When you bring fat to the cell to be converted into ATP only two compounds of CO2 are produced as a byproduct of the conversion process.

In other words the tax on converting sugar to ATP is 30% greater than when you convert fat into ATP. CO2 makes the cellular environment more acidic. A more acidic cell sounds to me like something to avoid, but here’s exactly why it’s the opposite of good: the lower pH environment in the cell results in less ATP production by the Proton Pump. Less ATP equals less available fuel or energy. 
See the Proton Pump pumping out ATP (gold nuggets) in this cellular animation video from 1:10 – 1:30:

SOLUTION

Direct your body towards burning your own body fat for energy. Eating cereal and “energy bars” before exercise is not the way. Eating primarily healthy fats and proteins no sooner than 2-4 hours prior to exercise and pumping the brakes on the carbs until after the gym is one way. Taking in the healthy fats more regularly trains your cells how to use fat for fuel more efficiently. The post-training carbs will top-off any depleted glycogen stores just in case you ever need them. Only thing is you may not need them very often if you are regularly burning fat for fuel – converting fat into energy equals more gold nuggets of ATP available to do more work with! 

TAKE TO THE TRENCHES

Start slow and give this a try before your less intense, shorter workout days to get used to it. Keep in mind that unless you are hungry there is no law that says you must eat before you break a sweat. Assuming your goal is fat burn then exercising on an empty stomach is one way to become a fat burning machine!

IF YOU LIKED WHAT YOU READ HERE, BE SURE TO SHARE IT.  

@tdathletesedge #paleo #paleodiet #crossfit #TDAE

Tim DiFrancesco, PT, DPT, ATC, CSCS is the Head Strength & Conditioning Coach for the Los Angeles Lakers and President of TD Athletes Edge, where he provides fitness, recovery and nutrition guidance to aspiring and professional athletes. For training advice, visit http://www.tdathletesedge.com and follow him on Twitter/Instagram through @tdathletesedge. 

References:

Powering the Cell: Mitochondria [Motion picture]. (n.d.). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RrS2uROUjK4.
Special thanks to Dr. Cate Shanahan and Luke Shanahan for helping me to explore the goldmine that is the Proton Pump.”

Alcohol and the effects on diet

  
I’m going to put together some references And articles here from various sources which I hope you enjoy

From Dr Atkins

“Here’s the problem with all alcoholic beverages, and the reason I recommend refraining from alcohol consumption on the diet. Alcohol, whenever taken in, is the first fuel to burn. While that’s going on, your body will not burn fat. This does not stop the weight loss, it simply postpones it, since the alcohol does not store as glycogen, and you immediately go back into ketosis/lipolysis after the alcohol is used up.

If you must drink alcohol, wine is an acceptable addition to levels beyond the Induction diet. If wine does not suit your taste, straight liquor such as scotch, rye, vodka, and gin would be appropriate, as long as the mixer is sugarless; this means no juice, tonic water; or non-diet soda. Seltzer and diet soda are appropriate.”

From Cynthia Sass

“Over the years, many of my clients have confided that too many cocktails on the weekend, followed by alcohol-induced overeating, cancels out their work-week healthy eating efforts. And as a result, instead of seeing results, they remain “stuck” in a weight loss plateau. Sound familiar? This trend is supported by a new UK survey, which found that in a single evening out on the town, 40% of women consume about 1,000 calories in alcohol alone. In addition, more than half say that imbibing makes them hungrier, and four in five admit that drinking diminishes their willpower, causing them to indulge in foods like burgers, pizza, and chips. If alcohol is your diet downfall, try putting these seven tips into action.

1. Eat before you drink

When your stomach is empty, alcohol is absorbed quickly, which means you’ll feel the effects within minutes. But eating something rich in lean protein and/or good fat, which are both digested and absorbed slowly, creates a buffer. So to curtail your tipsiness, nibble on something like a golf ball-sized portion of nuts, or fresh guacamole with veggies before you take your first sip.

2.Count your drinks correctly

If you count one drink as one of what you’re served, you may be greatly underestimating your intake. Technically, 12 oz of light beer (one bottle or can), 5 oz of red or white wine (a little smaller than a yogurt container), and 1 shot of liquor all pack about the same amount of alcohol, and each contains roughly 100 calories. But one study found that wine and liquor served at restaurants are about 40% larger than these standard drink portions. Another report, out last week, found that beer and wine contain higher alcohol levels these days, so when you order a drink out, you may be getting 50% more alcohol than you think. In addition, if you order a pint of beer (16 oz), you’ll get four extra ounces than one standard drink, and then there are mixed drinks that contain more than one shot (like those illustrious Long Island Iced Teas!). The lesson: if you underestimate your intake, you may be far tipsier than you think. That means not only more alcohol calories than you counted on, but also a loosier goosier state of mind than may seriously affect your appetite.

3. Slim down your drink order

If you’re a beer drinker, the type you order can have a big impact on your nutritional bottom line. A bottle or can of ultra low carb beer contains about 3-4 grams of carbs. But a regular version packs at least 10 grams, about as much as 10 mini pretzels. That means three a week adds up to an extra 1,560 grams of carb per year, the equivalent of nearly five loaves of bread. Drinks made with mixers are even bigger carb and calorie traps. Just four ounces (a half cup), of a sweetened mixer will cost you a whopping 25 grams of carb (about 14 gummy bears worth), and decadent drinks like a mudslide can contain over 500 calories, more than the amount a slice of chocolate cake.

4. Slow your pace

One of the biggest culprits in alcohol-driven overeating is getting too tipsy, too fast. To slow down the rise in your blood alcohol level, order a tall glass of water with every alcoholic drink. Alternate sips, and be sure to finish at least 12 ounces of H2O for every cocktail. This simple strategy may cut your total consumption in half.

5. Prevent mindless munching

If you’re at a bar with free happy hour apps, or one that serves up goodies, like popcorn or nuts, turn your back on the free fare, or place them out of arm’s reach. Research shows you’ll mindlessly munch if food is right in front of you, without even realizing it, and even if you aren’t hungry. But if it’s out of sight, you’re much less likely to seek it out.

6. Pre-plan your post-drink meal

Alcohol can indeed act as an appetite stimulant. And we all know it lowers inhibitions. So if you don’t want to give in to eating things you wouldn’t touch if you were sober, create a pre-drinking strategy. Stash something in your bag, like an all natural energy bar, so you won’t grab a greasy slice of pizza. Or scope out restaurants nearby where you’re going out, so if your friends want to grab a bite, you can suggest a spot where you know you can order a healthier option. Finally, strategically place some light snacks within sight at home, like pre-popped organic popcorn on the countertop, or cut fruit and fresh veggies and hummus front and center in the fridge. If you get a case of the munchies before bed, you’re much more likely to grab what’s readily available, rather than digging for something like chips or cookies.

7. Volunteer to be the designated driver

The best way to prevent alcohol from derailing your diet is to avoid drinking altogether. One tactic is to save your group taxi or ride-sharing costs by offering to drive (stick with naturally calorie-free club sodas with lime all night). While it may not be as fun as indulging with your group, you’re the one who’ll wake up the next day without a food or alcohol hangover, and that feels pretty darn good.
What’s your take on this topic? Does alcohol get in your way of eating healthfully and managing your weight? Please tweet your thoughts to @CynthiaSass and @goodhealth”

Staying focused

Can anyone explain to me why it’s so difficult to have that memento and stick to something? I seem to fail continuously at this whether it’s sticking to a diet or going to a gym. The sad thing is I know I’m doing it yet it keeps happening and I do want to get fit and lose weight! 

Perhaps I have an underlying desire not to succeed and it is much easier to fail. My excuse is my work. I have a very pressured job. I’m always bringing stuff home to do sometimes I do it sometimes I don’t but it sits there mocking me and consequently I don’t go to the gym and then feel guilty! That then spirals into what’s the point!

I have a 10 year old and she does so many things after school and weekends I find I don’t have time and come 9pm I am winding down. On the odd times I have taken her with me she is happy to wait for me if I do a spin class or activity. 

I need to lose a good 40 pounds but I think  the answer is locking me up. I want to see results in weeks though!  

I need my own personal trainer! Vinnie Tortorich are you free! I need the worlds angriest trainer to yell at me! 

I have read loads of books and understand the healthy living approach , no sugar no grains, paleo approach and I love the food. I confess I have had some chocolate this week and for the first time in ages pizza! I was persuaded by my daughters friend to get a dominos. Not only did it cost the earth but it was revolting. I genuinely felt sick, bloated and had a headache afterwards. It didn’t even taste good! 

What is the secret of success and being able to stick at something? Perhaps I believe I will fail at the outset and it’s one of those self perpetuating cycles 

Feeling fed up!  

 

Why ketogenic?

The whole idea of a ketogenic diet sounds so appealing. To be in the state of ketosis when your bodily fat is being effectively consumed from within is something that I would imagine all of the overweight people would hope to achieve. It’s almost like creating your own science project and you are the project. The extremes of it is what worries me, the need to check urine samples and some even go so far as blood samples to see if their body is in the state of ketosis. It’s all going a bit far for my liking and maybe though it’s why I am a failed dieter as I will not go the extra step and have the single mindedness to pursue this dream.

The whole paleo, Banting NSNG is appealing as of course their diet, in my opinion (theirs may differ) is ketogenic.

You do need the right tools though to be successful. Obviously firstly is frame of mind and with that comes determination and self belief, we can all diet it’s not rocket science – just eat less! Also we need to have the right foods available to us and to plan our menus for tasty and satisfying food that once eaten will not cause us to waiver! Sometimes that is of course easier said than done.

I have found that I am most successful when dieting if I record what I eat and initially check quantities as guessing portion size can sometimes be haphazard. To this end the wonderful app My Fitness Pal (MFP) is very useful and once you have stored your favourites on it you will find you can add your daily foods simply and sometimes just by scanning the bar code. Recipe creation is easy too, though not so easy to amend a recipe once created!

My failure to date has been not correctly measuring my quantities and recording my foods – well and of course eating the wrong foods!

I have also discovered a great website that actually works out for you on a ketogenic basis what your protein carbohydrate fat intake should be! As the app MFP gives you a breakdown of these ratios in food they both work together really well. Here is the site:

http://keto-calculator.ankerl.com

Or you can try:

http://www.ruled.me/keto-calculator/

For the next week I am going to use the MFP to track my success and monitor how closely I am following the suggested ratios and what the results for me are.

I am also conscious that I don’t drink enough water. I probably have only 4 drinks a day, MFP enables you to record your drinks too so I need to make use of this and record!

Exercise is another issue, you can record what you do on MFP so it’s a really handy app to have!

What is your body fat percentage? These pictures help you to have a rough guess

Is sugar making you fat?

Since being more aware of what I am eating it’s shocking what you can discover!

“This generation of children will lead shorter lifespans of their parents, sugar has been pumped into so many low fat foods, the USDA has an inherent conflict of interest when it comes to US agriculture and setting dietary guidelines, big food doesn’t necessarily want us to know what we are eating, labels don’t tell the whole story, marketing to children is basically coopting their brains and wiring them at a very early age and we can actually do something about all of these things.” – Katic Couric (1a)

Katie Couric journalist, author and talk-show host is executive producer of her recent documentary ‘Fed Up,’ directed written and produced by Stephanie Soechtig a documentary which illustrates how sugar is impacting the health and well-being of American society. America is not alone, with obesity rates in Australia tipping near 30%, 31% in New Zealand, Canada is pushing near 25%, in Europe 23% of women and 20% of men are obese. These figures do not include the percentage of overweight people within these countries which pushes these numbers significantly higher. In some cases the combined percentage of populations that are either overweight or obese is almost 70%. For example in the UK 67% of men and 57% of women are either overweight or obese. Sarah Wilson’s I Quit Sugar website outlines some of the health risks of high sugar diets and has links to some of the studies and research undertaken around sugar and high fructose corn syrup. Some of these include: sugar ages the body and causes wrinkles, increased risk of heart disease, increasing the risk of cancer and sugar increases your risk of diabetes A retrospective, worldwide study found small increases in sugar can lead to significant increases in diabetes rates. The white stuff makes you fat, a meta-analysis study published in the British Medical Journal shows increased sugar intake is significantly associated with weight gain and an increased risk of obesity in children having just one sweetened drink per day.(1)

‘Fed Up’ premiered at the Sundance Film Festival this year which suggested Sugar may be the New Cigarettes? Fed Up traces back the last 35 years and makes a convincing case that big business is to blame. (When isn’t it?) The food industry responded to the McGovern Report by flooding the grocery aisles with “healthy” chips, cookies, drinks and cereals that cut fat while quietly upping the sugar. Since then, sugar consumption has doubled. It’s not because we’re pounding down the pound cakes — a breakfast of orange juice and a bowl of processed cereal maxes out our ideal sugar intake for the rest of the day. Sugar increases insulin, insulin increases fat storage. And it’s addictive. In a study Soechtig quotes, 93 percent of lab rats chose sugar water over cocaine. At this rate, in twenty years, 95 percent of the population will be obese, a crisis that affects every aspect of our country’s stability from health care spending to national defense. A group of retired military leaders is so alarmed by our out-of-shape society that they’ve issued a warning study called “Too Fat to Fight.” At that point in the screening, the slender actresses to the right of me tsk-tsked, but then Fed Up dropped a bomb: 40 percent of thin people are also fat, their internal organs padded with enough damaging blubber that they may as well be clinically obese. Behold, our new national paranoia: TOFI, or Thin Outside, Fat Inside. (2)

“The Government is subsidizing the obesity epidemic.” – Michael Pollan
Fed Up shows how the first dietary guidelines issued by the U.S. government 30 years ago overlooked the role of dietary sugar in increasing risks of obesity, diabetes, and associated ill-health outcomes, particularly in children. Since these guidelines effectively condoned unlimited addition of sugar to foods consumed by children, sugar consumption has greatly increased, obesity has skyrocketed, and generations of children have grown up far fatter than their parents. These children face impaired health and shorter lifespans as a result. The film upends the conventional wisdom of why we gain weight and lays bare the misinformation put forth on how to lose it. It reveals that far more of the American public gets sick from what they eat than anyone realized. The film traces the history of processed foods adding dangerous levels of sugar and sweeteners to their roster of ingredients. (It began in the late 1970s with the rise of low-fat foods and has intensified since then.) Doctors bemoan the rise of adult-onset diabetes in young children, as well as children suffering strokes and heart attacks at a very young age, due to their excessive intake of sugar.(3)

“There are 600,000 food items in America, 80% of them have added sugar.” – Dr Robert Lustig
“Fed Up” is a mixture of in-the-life coverage and a roster of talking heads that include former President Bill Clinton. Soechtig spent two years with a group of kids, documenting their efforts to improve their health through dieting and exercise. The tragedy, her film argues, is that the pervasiveness of the food industry and the misinformation it disseminates has stacked all the odds against them. Personal responsibility and freedom of choice has always been Big Food’s counter to accusations of public endangerment, but if the American people has been so intricately misled, where is the personal freedom to make the right decision for one’s health? If “Fed Up” is persuasive and passionate enough in making its argument, it could lead to a huge difference in how we view healthy consumption. (4)

Article by Andrew Martin editor of onenesspublishing and author of One ~ A Survival Guide for the Future…

Sources

(1a) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tHq4_a0y9U

(1) http://iquitsugar.com/science/

(2) http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2014/01/fed-up-sugar-documentary.php

(3)http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2014/01/29/katie-couric-documentary/5019841/

(4) http://www.indiewire.com/article/sundance-curiosities-will-fed-up-be-the-last-straw-for-americas-food-industry

Country Obesity Statistics

http://www.heartfoundation.org.au/SiteCollectionDocuments/Factsheet-Overweight-and-obesity.pdf

http://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/obesity

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/canada-s-obesity-rates-triple-in-less-than-30-years-1.2558365

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/may/29/uk-western-europe-obesity-study

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-624-x/2014001/article/11922-eng.htm#a7

http://www.euro.who.int/en/health-topics/noncommunicable-diseases/obesity/data-and-statistics

Lo carb kids

Taken from ditchthecarbs.com  Since reading this I am thinking more about my daughters lunch box and trying to educate her regarding food and wheat intake. Please read this article: 

All children will benefit from lowering their carb, sugar, and wheat intake. You don’t need to be so strict with children in the healthy weight range, as they are generally more insulin sensitive than adults are, so their body can deal with sugars and carbs more efficiently. Overweight children should be controlled quite tightly. Studies have shown that children eating a ”low carb high fat’ diet, loose more weight and keep it off far better than those on a ‘calorie restricted low fat diet’.

I have written a series on Low Carb Kids. There are some great infographics and printables to help planning lunch boxes easier.

Low Carb Kids 1 – tips and tricks
Low Carb Kids 2 – printable guide to get your kids involved. How to plan you lunchbox each day.
Low Carb Kids 3 – 2 weeks of school lunches and how to plan them.
Low Carb Kids 4 – how to make a low carb lunchbox, and more Low Carb lunchbox ideas

All children will benefit from drinking less soft drinks (and energy drinks are an absolute no-no), less cakes, less sweets, less ice cream, less chips and tomato sauce (and don’t even get me started on chicken nuggets and pizza). Their bodies are growing at a rapid rate, and if we don’t feed them the nutrients they need for all the complex mechanisms that are going on inside their body, we are setting them up for a very unhealthy future. It is so sad when some children exist on litres of soft drinks, hot chips, pies, McDonalds, KFC, Subway – DAILY. Next time you see a bunch of teenagers hanging out at the mall, what are they eating? Usually some kind of takeaway washed down with an energy drink. Zero nutrition. These are beautiful growing bodies who have an addiction to high energy foods, neglect whole foods, and are probably deficient in some area. Try and really think about what your children have eaten in the last week. Make a mental note or log into My Fitness Pal and track it.

This is a great little video from the daughters of Tim Naughton, maker of ‘Fat Head Movie’. To see all their videos, see my link on You Tube.

I want to teach my children about having a healthy lifestyle –

for their bodies to be well nourished (which is different from well fed)
to be able to concentrate at school
not eating to excess
enjoying treats
eating real whole food
making good choices
enjoy trying new foods (our family rule is “you don’t have to like them, but you do have to try them”)
being active is fun
health and nutrition are a priority
Children need good FATS – they keep you full for longer, contain essential fatty acids and supply the fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K.

Children need protein – building blocks of their growing muscles.

Children need carbohydrates – but no where near what people think. Even severely restricting carbohydrates, the body can still make it through gluconeogenesis from excess protein.

Children need vegetables – fibre, vitamins, minerals, trace elements, antioxidants, phytochemicals and all the other hundreds of compounds that haven’t even been discovered yet. Fruits and vegetables should not be seen as equal. Fruit is incredibly high in carbs,especially fructose. Eat whole fruits (and never fruit juice or dried fruits), as the whole fruit contains fibre and nutrients, but don’t consider they are equal as vegetables. Be aware of the fructose content of fruit, and limit to 1 or 2 pieces a day. Go for lower sugar fruit such as berries. Cut back on high sugar tropical fruits such as pineapple, melons, grapes, etc.

How many parents do you know where they just laugh and say their children just WON’T eat vegetables. It is your responsibility as a parent to ensure they are properly nourished. It’s your convenience of not having a battle at the dinner table that allows them to refuse vegetables. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying it is easy, but establish a few family rules, one at a time, which let them know it is not negotiable. Go slowly as it may be a big change for some families. Be proud of what you have achieved. Little by little.

Our first family rule is they have to try everything. They don’t have to like it, but they have to try it
Keep introducing that food (maybe weekly) until they enjoy it, this may take forever, but you do get there
Get them to smother the food in something they do like to hide the taste (remember, they HAVE to eat some of it)
Flavour your vegetables. My children would turn up their noses at most greens until I made them silver beet carbonara, Asian greens etc. I almost cry when my youngest asks for more, a proud mum moment.
Put butter and cream cheese on the table instead of tomato sauce (way too processed and full of sugar). Let them flavour their own food. They have control and won’t battle so much.
Put twice as much of something on the plate as you know they will eat and then you can negotiate they only have to eat half (sneaky psychology, but man this one works).
Get them to choose what to go in their lunch boxes. I know what each of my children’s tastes are so make their lunchbox accordingly. I’m not saying I make totally different lunch boxes, but where one has tomatoes and feta, my youngest will have capsicum and carrots. I still add one thing a day to push them. At the moment it’s a cherry tomato each day for the boys. They know I will check each day to see if it has been eaten, if not, they have to eat it before they eat their afternoon tea.
I would say I am pretty good at what I feed them at home (all the pictures you see, are our actual meals), but I don’t restrict them in any way when they are at friends or at parties. No one likes a diet bore or a food restrictor. It would be great if other parents made good choices, but really, it’s not making up a huge part of their diet. This would be different of course if your child has a true food allergy or intolerance, but my children never have. My focus at home is always restrict the carbs and restrict poor food choices.

Eating out is a tough one. Most cafes sell cakes, muffins, donuts, sandwiches, juice, …. and sometimes there is no other choice. Thats ok, just make sure they have the best of what is there and NO juice. Save your $$$ and ask for a jug of water. Try and adapt what is on offer.

BEST LOW CARB TIP EVER!!!!

If we go to McDonalds, I always choose a small burger meal, but choose a diet coke and replace the fries with a side salad. I then open the burger and put the meat patties, sauces and cheese on top of the salad. Voila, the regular meal would have been 870 kCal, 133g carbs, my new meal is only 204kCal and 4g carbs!!!!! It just takes a bit of thinking. My children don’t drink many soft drinks but when they do I always get diet drinks if we are eating out, I know there is a lot of controversy about artificial sweeteners, but I personally choose them.

“STRIVE FOR IMPROVEMENT, NOT PERFECTION”